Grade Recovery Opportunity

Many students have asked about extra credit. As you probably know by now, I do not provide extra credit opportunities. However, I have decided to offer a grade recovery opportunity. What’s that you may wonder? It’s a way to improve your score on assignments you did not turn in or assessments grades that you did not score an 80 or higher. It is completely optional. Here are the details for the two different ways you can complete a grade recovery assignment.

Classwork, Homework and Lab Assignments:

  1. You can only do a grade replacement for assignments with a score below 80% or missing assignments. The highest grade you will receive on the grade recovery assignment is an 80%.
  2. Choose a nonfiction reading passage related to the assignment you are missing/recovering. For instance, if you are missing an ocean water lab, you should read a passage about ocean water. The passage should be 2-3 pages long minimum.
  3. Write a two paragraph summary of what you read.
  4. Complete a bibliography stating the article you read, book publisher, website address, page numbers, author, etc.
  5. Reference the assignment you are replacing on the top of the page with your name.
  6. Turn in to the class folder.

Assessment Assignments:

  1. You can only do a grade replacement for assessments with a score below 80%. You can grade recover multiple standards from the same assessment and it will count towards all standards from that assessment. However, your summary must address all of the standards you are grade recovering.
  2. The highest grade you will receive on the grade recovery assignment is an 80%.
  3. Choose a nonfiction reading passage related to the assessment. For instance, if you are reassessing the weather patterns and climate assessment, you would read a passage about weather and climate. The passage you read should be 7-8 pages minimum
  4. Write a five paragraph summary of what you read.
  5. Complete a bibliography stating the article you read, book publisher, website address, page numbers, author, etc.
  6. Reference the assessment and standards you are replacing on the top of the page with your name.
  7. Turn in to the class folder.

Fine Print:

  1. You may only grade recover a total of 3 assignments/assessments. Each assessment would count as one even though there are multiple standards.
  2. Grade recovery assignments are due no later than Tuesday, April 29. No late grade recovery assignments will be accepted.
  3. This opportunity does not apply to your interim score.
  4. If you have any questions, please ask Mrs. Wilson.

Where are we?

Homework: Finish your story strip about the microgravity article if you did not turn it in during class. Unit 11 test will be next Wednesday, so start studying now.

  1. Microgravity article story strip.
  2. Microgravity flight video (see below).
  3. Comets, asteroids, and meteors quiz.
  4. Started thinking about where we are in the universe by answering some questions. Tomorrow, we will analyze some clues so we can determine where we are.

 

What orchestrates the dance of the planets?

Homework: Comets, asteroids, and meteors quiz tomorrow

  1. Planets quiz
  2. Concept attainment review (see below).
  3. Y-chart notes on gravity and inertia. (See video embedded below).
  4. Began reading microgravity article. Tomorrow, we will complete the two readings and the story strip.

 

What is the difference between comets, asteroids, and meteors?

Homework: Planets quiz tomorrow; you do not need to know specific distances, diameters, etc.

  1. Comets, asteroids and meteors foldable (three tab). Explained for each one what it is, where it is, and what it looks like. For comets, we also included a diagram labeling the parts. On the meteors tab, we discussed the difference between meteoroids, meteors, and meteorites.
  2. Using the resources below to complete the foldable.
  3. Studying Space Quiz.

Read these articles to help you complete your notes on comets, asteroids, and meteors.

Here are some websites to help you with additional research.

Additional information about comets, asteroids, and meteors:

Comets asteroids meteors wilson 2013 with foldable from Janelle Wilson

What is the difference between comets, asteroids, and meteors?

Homework: Quiz on how we studying space/space exploration tomorrow.

  1. Reviewed studying space/space exploration.
  2. Reviewed planets grid notes and checked information.
  3. Began discussing comets, asteroids, and meteors including watching song below. Tomorrow, we will create our notes using the information below. You do not need to do anything before then unless you want to get a head start.

 

Read these articles to help you complete your notes on comets, asteroids, and meteors.

Here are some websites to help you with additional research.

What have I learned about the Sun-Earth-Moon System?

We took our test today. I have graded the tests, and you will get them back tomorrow. I won’t have a chance to get them in the grade book until tomorrow, though.

Remember, I’m out the remainder of the week, so be awesome while I’m out. :) I’ll be at the National Science Teachers Association national conference to learn more about awesome science teaching and to present about how I teach rocks and our microgravity flight this past summer.

What have I learned about the Sun, Earth, moon system?

Homework: Study for tomorrow’s test.

  1. Standard 10d quiz (eclipses).
  2. Passed back and discussed standard 12a1 quiz.
  3. Passed back and discussed standard 10a quiz.
  4. Passed back and discussed standard 10b quiz.
  5. Passed back and discussed standard 1oc quiz.
  6. Reviewed for tomorrow’s test.

Here are some key things to review for each standard:

  • 12a1: the people (Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, and Newton) and what they did
  • 1oa: difference between rotation (spin) and revolution (orbit)
  • 10b: seasons and the tilt of Earth’s axis
  • 10c: moon phases
  • 10d: eclipses

Your Chance to See a Lunar Eclipse in a Few Weeks!

I shared this with a couple of classes, but we have a total lunar eclipse coming up in the early morning hours of April 15th. So, it’s a good news/bad news scenario: an awesome lunar eclipse – but it’s on a school night! Still, I think it might be worth it to go to bed early and get up to watch. Here’s a video that explains what you should see and the timing of the eclipse. Enjoy!

Field guide to the total lunar eclipse of April 14 – 15, 2014 from Michael Zeiler on Vimeo.

Why do we see eclipses?

Homework: Eclipse Quiz on Monday; Unit 10 (Sun-Earth-Moon System) Assessment on Tuesday. Here is an old study guide and some notes that may or may not be helpful to you as you review this unit: Sun-Earth-Moon system notes Earth-moon-sun system 12-13

Announcement: This week, tutoring will be on Monday. There will be no tutoring Thursday, April 3rd, as I will be out of town.

 

  1. Moon Phases Quiz.
  2. Eclipses Modeling lab and eclipse simulators (see below). Eclipses
  3. Simulator #1: Eclipses overview
  4. Simulator #2: Eclipse shadow simulator
  5. Simulator #3: Moon inclination simulator

If you would like some additional information on eclipses, check out these YouTube videos:

We’ll be reviewing for Tuesday’s test on Monday in class. Also, please remember I am out Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday (April 2-4) for the National Science Teachers Association National Conference in Boston. Not only will I have a chance to attend this national conference for the first time, I am also presenting two different sessions!

Eclipse Simulators

Before or after completing the lab, look through these simulations of eclipses to help you understand what is happening during an eclipse.

  1. Simulator #1: Eclipses overview
  2. Simulator #2: Eclipse shadow simulator
  3. Simulator #3: Moon inclination simulator